Story Understanding Resources

Collected by Erik T. Mueller
Last updated 2014-01-09

Meetings

Story understanding programs

  1. Story comprehension model (1972; MIT; demons)
  2. Ms. Malaprop (1977; University of Geneva/Yale; frames)
  3. QUALM (1977; Yale; question answering theory and program, used by SAM)
  4. News article comprehension model (1977; MIT; frames, linking, mapping)
  5. SAM (1978; Yale; scripts)
  6. PAM (1978; Yale; plans, goals)
  7. CYRUS (1978; Yale; episodic memory)
  8. POLITICS (1979; Yale; political ideology)
  9. FRUMP (1979; Yale; news story skimming)
  10. IPP (1980; Yale; generalization, episodic memory, integrated parsing)
  11. BORIS (1982; Yale; scripts, plans, goals, emotions, themes, integrated parsing)
  12. Wimp (1986; Brown; marker passing)
  13. FAUSTUS (1987; UC Berkeley; marker passing)
  14. CRAM (1989; UCLA; connectionism, morals)
  15. OpEd (1989; UCLA; editorial comprehension)
  16. AQUA (1989; Yale; asking and answering questions while reading, explanation)
  17. ROBIN (1989; UCLA; connectionism)
  18. EL/Epilog/Ecologic (1989; University of Alberta, University of Rochester, Boeing; natural-language-like logical representation)
  19. KT (1989; IBM, University of Western Ontario; logic, commonsense reasoning)
  20. SWALE (1990; Yale; explanation)
  21. Retriever/Anon (1990; Yale; indexing and retrieving planning knowledge)
  22. Accepter (1990; Yale; evaluating explanations)
  23. Tweaker/ABE (1990; Yale; adapting explanations)
  24. TACITUS (1990; SRI; logic, weighted abduction)
  25. Wimp3 (1990; Brown; probabilistic account of marker passing)
  26. DISCERN (1990; UCLA; scripts, connectionism)
  27. THUNDER (1991; UCLA; irony, ethics)
  28. ARIEL (1991; UCLA; analogy, editorial comprehension)
  29. Construction-integration model (1992; University of Colorado at Boulder; construction-integration)
  30. Automatic inference (1992; UC Berkeley; probabilistic account of marker passing)
  31. Story Gestalt model (1992; CMU; scripts, connectionism)
  32. REMIND (1992; UCLA; spreading activation, memory retrieval)
  33. KERNEL (1993; Unisys; complex interaction among system modules)
  34. Golden and Rumelhart model (1993; UT Dallas, Stanford; situation-state space)
  35. AbMaL (1994; UC Irvine/Northwestern; emotions, situation calculus)
  36. COMPERE (1995; Georgia Tech; integrated syntax-semantics)
  37. SNePS/Cassie (1995; SUNY Buffalo; propositional semantic networks, beliefs)
  38. Modified construction-integration model (1995; University of Chicago; connectionism, construction-integration model)
  39. Meta-AQUA (1996; Georgia Tech; learning, empirical study on TALE-SPIN stories)
  40. ThoughtTreasure (1996; Signiform; plans, goals, emotions, grids, simulation)
  41. NKRL (1996; CNRS; language for representing content of narratives)
  42. ISAAC (1997; Georgia Tech; creative reading)
  43. KARMA (1997; UC Berkeley; x-schemas, metaphor, aspect)
  44. Deep Read (1999; MITRE; reading comprehension)
  45. Spatio-Temporal Model (2000; LIMSI-CNRS; physical model)
  46. Aquareas (2000; DSO National Laboratories, Singapore; reading comprehension)
  47. Reading comprehension programs (2000; Brown University; reading comprehension)
  48. Quarc (2000; University of Utah; reading comprehension)
  49. Story understanding model (2003; New Mexico State University; commonsense aspects)
  50. Model-based story understanding program (2003; IBM Research; event calculus, satisfiability)
  51. Distributed Situation Space (DSS) model (2003; Tilburg, Nijmegen, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics; microworld, situation-state space, self-organizing maps)
  52. Semantic Stories (2003; University of Edinburgh; plot analysis, latent semantic analysis [LSA], event calculus)
  53. CPL (2005; Boeing; computer-processable language)
  54. STORY (2005; University of Maryland and University of Naples "Federico II"; extracting stories from text and other data sources)

Early natural language understanding programs

Story understanding bibliography

Story understanding and psychology

Story understanding and literary theory

Story generation programs

  1. Automatic Novel Writing (1973; University of Wisconsin-Madison; simulation language)
  2. TALE-SPIN (1976; Yale; simulation, goals, plans)
  3. UNIVERSE (1983; Columbia; person frames, stereotypes, past events)
  4. ROALD (1983; University of Exeter; goals, simulation)
  5. Racter (1984; William Chamberlain and Thomas Etter; syntax directives)
  6. Daydreamer (1987; UCLA; daydreaming, planning, episodic memory, emotions)
  7. ALIBI (1987-1990, BGU, Israel; planner decomposing an accusation and proposing a self-exonerating explanation)
  8. Author (1989; Yale; reconstructive and dynamic memory)
  9. Oz (1989; CMU; interactive drama, goals, emotions)
  10. TAILOR (1991; University of Calgary; story space, planning)
  11. MINSTREL (1992; UCLA; planning advice themes, case-based reasoning)
  12. Dramatica (1993; Melanie Anne Phillips and Chris Huntley; Dramatica theory)
  13. Scenario Synthesizer (1998; Rutgers; formal scenario)
  14. Agent Stories (1999; MIT; authoring, story pieces, story agents)
  15. BRUTUS (2000; RPI; story grammars, frames)
  16. Author/StoryBook (2000; North Carolina State University; sentence planner, functional systemic grammar)
  17. MEXICA (2001; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, University of Birmingham; engagement-reflection)
  18. MAKEBELIEVE (2002; MIT; Open Mind Common Sense)
  19. Façade (2003; Georgia Tech and InteractiveStory.net; interactive drama)
  20. IDtension (2004; LINC, University of Paris 8; graph-based narrative structures)
  21. Fabulist (2004; North Carolina State University; planning, plot coherence, character believability)
  22. Story Plot Generation Based on CBR (2005; Universidad Complutense de Madrid; CBR)

Reading comprehension tests

Technical report/paper libraries

Related bibliographies

Commonsense/linguistic databases